Socialist Worker

28 Weeks Later: better meet a zombie than the US Marine corps

by Katherine Branney
Issue No. 2051

Robert Carlyle gets that sinking feeling

Robert Carlyle gets that sinking feeling


Like many zombie films, 28 Weeks Later has a message about contemporary politics and society. Its message is that the US military is far more dangerous than a plague of flesh eating monsters.

28 Weeks Later is the sequel to 28 Days Later in which a virus turned the vast majority of the British population into unthinking, aggressive creatures who attack anyone not like them.

In the latest film it’s six months on and all the zombies have died of starvation.

British refugees are returning to London to join the survivors of the horror.

Robert Carlyle is Don, who survived a zombie attack by abandoning his wife as she faced certain death.

He is racked with guilt when he is reunited with his two children months later.

The US military have taken control of the area around Canary Wharf and turned it into a “Green Zone” where people live in supposed security.

But, as with all US occupations, things soon start to go terribly wrong.

The film shows that, whatever the individual views and actions of US soldiers, there is a systemic flaw in the US military and the way it operates.

While it carries out slaughter very effectively, it will always mess up the operations where it is expected to be a bit more careful and protect people.

Director Juan Carlos Fresnadillo’s sharp, jerky shots whenever there is a zombie attack adds to the audience’s fear (as does the gore of the film).

There is always something fascinating and terrifying about seeing a familiar city becoming a post-apocalyptic wasteland.

In 28 Weeks Later, a London devoid of people, but with all the familiar landmarks intact, is utterly disconcerting.

28 Weeks Later is a great addition to the recent crop of films, such as Children of Men and V For Vendetta, which use a dystopian vision of Britain to question the society we live in.

They have all critiqued the basis of the “war on terror” and the propaganda of our rulers.

And it has all been done with excitement and style.


If you enjoy Socialist Worker, please consider giving to our annual appeal to make sure we can maintain and develop our online and print versions of Socialist Worker. Go here for details and to donate.

Article information

Reviews
Tue 15 May 2007, 18:31 BST
Issue No. 2051
Share this article


Mobile users! Don't forget to add Socialist Worker to your home screen.