Socialist Worker

Truth slowly trickles out about Ian Tomlinson death

Issue No. 2148

More state lies about the death of Ian Tomlinson at the G20 protests in London came unstuck last week as the second post-mortem, commissioned by the IPCC, returned a verdict that Ian died from an abdominal haemorrhage—internal bleeding.

This contradicts the initial findings of the first coroner, who claimed the cause of death was a heart attack.

The reputation and independence of the first coroner, Dr Freddy Patel, has been called into question.

Patel was previously reprimanded by the General Medical Council for telling reporters that Roger Sylvester, a black man who died in police custody in 1999, was a user of crack cocaine. Roger’s family strongly contested these claims.

The police initially claimed that they had no contact with Ian Tomlinson prior to his death.

Yet video footage and photographs by protesters and bystanders has shown that Ian was violently pushed over by police as he tried to walk home through the City on 1 April.

Ian Tomlinson’s family released a statement following the second post-mortem.

In it, they said, “First we were told that there had been no contact with the police, then we were told that he died of a heart attack; now we know that he was violently assaulted by a police officer and died from internal bleeding.

“As time goes on we hope that the full truth about how Ian died will be made known.”

Further tests are being carried out on Ian’s body to ascertain what caused the haemorrhage.

The officer who violently shoved and hit Ian with a baton has been suspended and has been questioned by the IPCC under caution on suspicion of manslaughter.

He is a member of the Territorial Support Group (TSG).

Campaigners have an important role to play in keeping up the pressure to make sure that the investigation into Ian’s death is not allowed to drag on indefinitely.

Mass pressure can stop the state getting away with any attempt to cover up what really happened on 1 April.


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