Socialist Worker

London meeting recalls Thatcher's toxic legacy

Issue No. 2349

Former miner Norman Strike

Former miner Norman Strike (Pic: Socialist Worker)


Over 200 people crammed into a jubilant public meeting on Thatcher’s toxic legacy yesterday, on the evening of Margaret Thatcher’s funeral.

The Socialist Workers Party (SWP) called the meeting.

Some of those there had come fresh from protests at the funeral in London. Speakers talked about how bitterness against Thatcher’s rule still runs deep. One described how in the ex-mining village of Goldthorpe, South Yorkshire, an effigy of Thatcher was burnt on a pyre.

South African Moyra Samuels described growing up under apartheid. She explained that Britain under Thatcher had 50 percent of foreign investment in the state and was “apartheid’s last friend”.

Charlie Kimber, SWP national secretary, described Thatcher’s publicly-funded funeral as a “political stunt”. He said Thatcher was “a brutal class warrior who wanted to grind down our class”.

Ex-miner Norman Strike talked about the courage and resilience of the miners’ and their struggle against the Tories. “I’m really proud that I stood up for my class," he added.

Phil Rowan from the Hillsborough campaign

Phil Rowan from the Hillsborough campaign (Pic: Socialist Worker)


John Tipple was an activist during the struggle against the poll tax. He said the struggle won because the Tories didn't "divide and rule" ordinary people.

Phil Rowan from the Justice for the 96 campaign spoke from the floor about Thatcher's role in the police cover-up of the 1989 Hillsborough football disaster.

Speakers from the floor said David Cameron wanted to continue Thatcher's legacy with his vicious attacks on the welfare state, the NHS and pensions.

“This is not a history lesson” argued Charlie. “It is about today.” John agreed, declaring to loud applause, “The struggle continues".


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