Socialist Worker

Judge calls Carlo's killing 'legitimate'

Issue No. 1851

AN ITALIAN court has dismissed a case against a policeman who shot dead Carlo Giuliani during protests against the G8 summit in Genoa two years ago. The judge ruled that the paramilitary police officer Mario Placanica had acted in 'legitimate self defence'.

Carlo's father, Giuliano Giuliani, said he was 'deeply disappointed' that the case had been dismissed. 'We were not asking for Placanica to be convicted, but we wanted a trial to take place,' he said. 'The dismissal of the case makes me suspect that they want to conceal the truth.'

The man who should really be in the dock is Silvio Berlusconi, who issued live ammunition to the forces deployed against the demonstrators. Berlusconi's regime systematically tried to smear the protesters and whitewash what the police had done.

A month after the summit, the head of the Italian police admitted that officers used 'excessive force' in dealing with demonstrators. Earlier this year a senior Genoa police officer, Pietro Troiani, admitted that police planted two Molotov cocktails in a school that was serving as a dormitory for protesters.

The bombs were apparently planted in order to justify the police force's brutal raid on the school. Another senior officer admitted to faking the stabbing of a police officer in order to frame demonstrators.


In the Frame - No. 10 Conrad Black

CONRAD Black owns the Daily Telegraph, which printed allegations against George Galloway. Black also owns the hawkish Jerusalem Post, which published untrue reports of chemical weapons finds in Iraq.

Black also owns Hollinger International, which has on its board war criminal Henry Kissinger and defence policy board hawk Richard Perle.


Picture did not tell story

ON THE same day that US troops shot dead another two people in Fallujah, Iraq, the Associated Press newswire carried a photo and article from the town. The story was headlined 'US Troops Fire On Iraq Protesters Again'. The picture showed protesters holding a banner which read (in English) 'Sooner or later US killers, we'll kick you out'.

But this is how AP reported it: ''Sooner or later US killers, we'll kill you' read an angry banner in English unfurled in the faces of GIs on guard in the central city.'

The article ran, with the wrong information, in USA Today, ABCNews.com, CBS News, Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, Chicago Sun-Times, Atlanta Journal - Constitution, Ha'aretz (Israel), Guardian (London), Globe and Mail (Toronto), and dozens of local newspapers.


Will he stop and search you?

HOW ABOUT a 'fully poseable male action figure' for your three year old in the shape of 12-inch riot cop with accessories? Public Order PC SO595 has a telescopic truncheon, riot shield and handcuffs. Your child could dress him up in a flak jacket, boots and helmet and have him use his loudhailer and fire extinguisher.

'All revenues will be recycled back into suitable Met police service activities,' said a Met spokesman. Demonstrators to beat up are not included.


Mossad loose in London

ASSASSINS ARE being allowed to roam the streets of London. Who are these terrorists? The Daily Mail reported them last week on its front page with the headline 'Israeli Secret Agents Target London'.

Israel's secret service, Mossad, employs killers. New Labour is planning to let them use the excuse of the suicide bombing by two Britons to crack down on Islamic groups in Britain.

Inside the System reported on 1 March that Mossad agents were preparing for 'targeted assassinations' in 'friendly' countries. Now that has become reality. Mossad operatives have spent the last 50 years assassinating and kidnapping. One of the most notorious examples took place in 1986 when Mossad agents came to London and lured the Israeli nuclear scientist Mordechai Vanunu to Rome where he was kidnapped and hauled back to Israel.

This was because he had revealed the existence of Israel's nuclear weaponry. In 1982 Mossad agents helped administer the murder by fascist Christian Phalange officers of 2,000 Palestinians in the Sabra and Shatilla refugee camps in Beirut.


Figure it out

98 - That's the percentage of executive director positions held by white people in companies listed on the Johannesburg stock exchange in South Africa. This is nine years after the end of apartheid.


Unilever's secret?

UNILEVER, THE Anglo-Dutch consumer goods giant, stands accused of encouraging child labour in India. The company, whose brands include Dove soap and Lipton tea, is one of a number of multinationals named in a damning report on underage employment in India's huge cotton seed industry.

The report, published by the India Committee of the Netherlands, said Unilever buys hybrid cotton seeds from farmers who pay children a handful of rupees to work long hours in hazardous conditions. It said about 90 percent of all labour in the Indian cotton seed market was carried out by 450,000 children, some of them as young as six and most of them girls.

'These girls work long days, are paid very little, are deprived of an education and are exposed for long periods to dangerous agricultural chemicals,' the report said. The report said children were offered biscuits, chocolate and other inducements to encourage them to work harder.

Unilever says it does not accept direct responsibility for employing the children.


Who says?

'He was a crook who absolutely cooked the books to hide his crimes.'
Mohammed Said Nabulsi former head of Jordan's central bank on Ahmad Chalabi, the US's favourite to lead post-war Iraq

'America was good at conquering Iraq, but not so good at governing it and may prove worse at shaping its future, so clueless it seems about Iraqi aspirations.'
Haroon Siddiqui, Toronto Star

'Foundation hospitals are really a Tory idea, based in part on the old NHS internal market.'
Daily Telegraph Editorial, 8 May

'We're teens, we're cute, we're radical to boot!'
Radical Teen cheerleaders in Los Angeles, US

'Who trained, who trained, Bin Laden? Who armed, who armed, Saddam Hussein?'
Radical Teen cheerleaders

'It has been nearly a month since Saddam Hussein and his regime disappeared from Baghdad, and yet officials have offered no clear road map towards President George Bush's goal of stabilising the country under a democratic government.'
Washington Post Editorial, 7 May


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Article information

Inside the System
Sat 17 May 2003, 00:00 BST
Issue No. 1851
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