Socialist Worker

Get rid of the monarchy, and the myths that make it

Issue No. 2406

Juan Carlos de Borbon, then being groomed for the throne by fascist General Franco, meets US President Richard Nixon in 1969

Juan Carlos de Borbon, then being groomed for the throne by fascist General Franco, meets US President Richard Nixon in 1969 (Pic: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration)


Within hours of vile Spanish monarch Juan Carlos announcing plans to abdicate, tens of thousands took to the streets of Spain protesting for a republic.

His ostentatious lifestyle at a time of rocketing unemployment made sure the monarchy couldn’t escape a crisis of legitimacy that has engulfed the Spanish state.

Yet it’s hard to find anything in the media that doesn’t balance criticism with hope for the future of the monarchy.

And the media whitewashing of Juan Carlos can’t compare with the toadying towards the parasite who wears the British crown and her family of racists and relics.

Monarchy has always relied on the making of myths.

Once kings claimed holy descent gave them the right to rule. Today they appeal to ancient national tradition.

But most of the tradition of Britain’s monarchy was only invented in the last 200 years. 

And Spain only has one at all because a remnant of the old French Bourbon dynasty was brought there from Italy by fascist dictator General Franco.

Today’s monarch retains only a little of the power wielded by their ancestors. 

Still they are happy to use it to enrich themselves, meddle in government or shroud its affairs in ceremonial secrecy.

But their main role is giving an air of legitimacy to capitalist states.

Our only hopes for their future involve the guillotine.


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