Socialist Worker

Bitter lemons for racists as Beyoncé gets political

by Saba Shiraz
Issue No. 2502

A still from Beyonces new video album Lemonade

A shot from Beyoncé's new video album Lemonade


“Beyoncé was five years ago unrecognisable from the militant activist we see now. Then, she was at pains to be seen as an entertainer and musician and not as a black woman who sings.”

So said Piers Morgan about Beyoncé’s latest music project, Lemonade. But why can’t she be both?

Morgan’s nonsense is a reflection of a society where sellable music must be devoid of politics and meaning, artists are products to be sold and profit comes before creativity.

The references to racial divisions and the oppression of black people in the album are very powerful.

Beyoncé sings about her own break up while exposing the deep-seated racism in US society.

The criticism towards her only affirms what we already know—capitalism has no place for strong black women who oppose its structures of oppression.

Is it any wonder that the racists in society are getting scared as she uses her huge platform and influence to unravel this?

The album is inspiring millions of people in a way that mainstream music hasn’t done in a long time.

As with artists such as Kendrick Lamar, Beyoncé’s music is only getting better as it articulates anger at injustice.


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