Socialist Worker

Cops won’t face charges over Sean Rigg’s death

Issue No. 2522

Marcia Rigg fighting for justice

Marcia Rigg fighting for justice (Pic: Guy Smallman)


The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has decided that no police officer will face charges over Sean Rigg’s death.

Sean died in Brixton police station, south London, in August 2008 following prolonged restraint by the cops.

An inquest jury in 2012 returned a damning verdict criticising the actions of the police and the unsuitable use of restraint.

An independent review heavily criticised the original IPCC watchdog’s investigation and the IPCC made the decision to re-open the disciplinary and criminal investigations into Sean’s death.

But following a review of the evidence the CPS said there is insufficient evidence to charge any of the five officers involved in the arrest, restraint and detention of Sean.

Marcia Rigg, Sean’s sister, said, “More than eight years after my brother died, I was informed that none of the officers involved in his death will face prosecution for what happened that day.

“After a damning review of the original IPCC investigation, and a successful challenge of the decision not to prosecute an officer for perjury, I had hoped for an opportunity to get justice.”

Deborah Coles, director of Inquest, said, “The CPS’s decision is deeply disappointing but not surprising given their track record.

“Sean Rigg’s family have struggled at every stage of this process for truth and justice, demonstrating the deep flaws in the system that should hold the police to account after deaths in custody.”


Five officers face probe over the paralysis of Julian Cole

Five police officers could face gross misconduct charges after student Julian Cole was left paralysed following his arrest in May 2013.

Julian was arrested outside a nightclub in Bedfordshire after asking for a refund.

He was restrained by security guards before being arrested by police officers out of the sight of CCTV cameras.

He only reappeared on CCTV as they carried him to the police van.

His brother said, “Julian did not need five officers to pin him down. He is only 5ft 5in and was unarmed.”

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) has referred the case to the Crown Prosecution Service to decide whether to bring criminal charges.

The IPCC has said the investigation is set to take three years, which the family’s lawyer says is “too long.”

In a separate statement Julian’s mother said, “Following contact with police officers that night he has been left paralysed and in a vegetative state and he will need 24-hour care for as long as he lives.

“Julian is still alive, but it cannot be said that he is really living.”


Telford march demands justice for Dalian Atkinson

The family of Dalian Atkinson marched with supporters in Telford last Saturday to demand answers into his death.

Dalian died soon after police shot him with a taser outside his father’s house last month.

Two officers have been served with gross misconduct notices and are under a criminal investigation.

The protest marched from the site of Dalian’s death to Malingsgate police station chanting, “Who are the murderers? Police are the murderers.”


Rotherham 12 campaign hosts justice convention

The Rotherham 12 campaign is holding a convention, Injustice in the System, in Sheffield this Saturday.

Speakers include lawyer Imran Khan and solicitor Gareth Peirce.

There will also be activists from the Hillsborough and Orgreave justice campaigns.

The Rotherham 12 campaign defends 12 Asian men arrested following an anti-fascist protest in Rotherham, South Yorkshire, last September.

More than 400 people joined a counter-demonstration called by Rotherham Unite Against Fascism on 5 September 2015.

A trial of the men, who face charges including violent disorder, is due to begin in Sheffield on 3 October.

Email rotherham12dc@gmail.com for more information or go to rotherham12dc.org

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