Socialist Worker

Strike ballot hits the buffers as threshold thwarts RMT

by Raymie Kiernan
Issue No. 2551

Workers at London Bridge are still set to strike

Workers at London Bridge are still set to strike (Pic: Flickr/Elliott Brown)


A vote for strikes by London Underground workers has been possibly the first to fall foul of new Tory ballot thresholds.

RMT union members were set to strike for 24 hours from 10pm on 7 May.

Their walkout is in defence of a colleague who was sacked and two others who were disciplined in what the union calls an “appalling miscarriage of justice”.

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But in two separate ballots of workers in the London Bridge and Waterloo areas, only the London Bridge group will be striking.

Both returned overwhelming votes to strike—over 90 percent in the London Bridge ballot and 75 percent in the Waterloo ballot backed strikes.

But those in Waterloo did not meet the new ballot thresholds introduced in last year’s Trade Union Act that came into force last month.

Often ballot turnouts can be low but the support for a strike much higher with members who don’t cast their vote still willing to join walkouts.

But this case is a lesson to all trade unionists involved in ballots to redouble efforts to maximise the vote.


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