Socialist Worker

Reports round up: 200 march to demand Orgreave inquiry

Issue No. 2609

Around 200 people marched near Orgreave, South Yorkshire, last Saturday to mark the 34th anniversary of the Battle of Orgreave. It saw cops attack miners during the 1984-85 Miners’ Strike, then frame 95 of them for riot. Ex-miners and campaigners have called for the government to announce an inquiry into police behaviour

Around 200 people marched near Orgreave, South Yorkshire, last Saturday to mark the 34th anniversary of the Battle of Orgreave. It saw cops attack miners during the 1984-85 Miners’ Strike, then frame 95 of them for riot. Ex-miners and campaigners have called for the government to announce an inquiry into police behaviour (Pic: Neil Terry)


Strikes lift pay for Gatwick workers

Baggage handlers and ground crew at London Gatwick Airport have scored a pay victory following their strike in March.

Almost 1,000 Unite union members have won an average 7.5 percent pay increase over two years.


Traffic wardens plan six stoppages

Traffic wardens in Hackney, east London, plan to walk out for six days from 9 July in their fight for higher pay.

The Unite union members are fighting for a 5 percent pay rise and better terms and conditions.

The 40 traffic wardens are employed by outsourcer APCOA Parking.


Walkouts to derail bosses’ pay offer

Workers at railways infrastructure company Unipart struck over pay on Wednesday of last week.

The RMT union members in Crewe are demanding an improvement on bosses’ offer of 2.75 percent and a £500 payment.


Jubilee Line strikes are suspended

The Aslef and RMT unions suspended a strike on the Jubilee Line planned for last Thursday.

The London Underground workers were fighting bosses’ attempts to impose new timetables that would affect weekend working.


Union holds ballot across TGI Fridays

The Unite union is launching a consultative ballot of all of its members at TGI Fridays.

It’s part of its campaign for reinstating the restaurant chain’s old tipping policy.

This follows strikes at stores in London, Gateshead, Milton Keynes and Manchester.


Ministry cleaners demand pay justice

Workers at the Ministry of Justice are beginning a ballot for strikes for the London Living Wage of £10.20 an hour and other demands.

The UVW union members are employed by outsourcer OCS Group.


Protest against luxury development

Housing campaigners were set to protest against the redevelopment of the Elephant and Castle shopping centre on Thursday.

It has been called by Stop the Elephant Development and Southwark Defend Council Housing.

Property developer Delancey wants to turn the centre into luxury flats.


Ballot in the North Sea

The Unite union is balloting offshore members at three North Sea platforms for industrial action over terms and conditions.

Workers at Total E&P on the Alwyn, Elgin and Dunbar platforms are voting until 28 June.

They agreed to work 14 days extra offshore at the height of the downturn in the oil industry. Now the union wants the days back and a return to a two weeks on, three weeks off rota.

The union claims the oil and gas firm has put forward a proposal for a rota of three weeks on and three weeks off—meaning an extra seven days offshore.

Wullie Wallace, Unite regional industrial officer, said, “No one should be expected to work 21 days in a row.”


Fight for worker status 

Two legal cases highlighted the battle for workers’ rights in the “gig economy” last week.

The first was the case of Gary Smith, who worked for Pimlico Plumbers for six years until 2011.

He requested a three-day working week after having a heart attack and was refused.

Last week the Supreme Court found that he was a worker, and not self-employed as the firm had claimed.

Worker status means Smith should have been entitled to benefits such as sick pay, although not all the benefits someone with employee status would be entitled to.

In another case, Deliveroo riders received permission for their judicial review of a previous block on their collective bargaining case against the firm to go ahead.

The workers’ union, the Independent Workers of Great Britain, will now take the case forward.


Nothern lines at a standstill

Train Guards on Arriva Rail North (Northern) planned a strike on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

This is part of a dispute over the future of guards and safety on the railways.

Bosses refuse to guarantee that a second safety-trained member on staff will be on the train at all times.

The RMT union says more driver-only operation trains will make rail travel unsafe and inaccessible.

Workers were also due to strike on the Greater Anglia network 16-23 June, but this was suspended after a new offer from bosses. Guards on South Western Railway had been due to strike this week but it was called of for talks.

Coordinated strikes are the best way to keep up the pressure.


Click here to subscribe to our daily morning email newsletter 'Breakfast in red'

Mobile users! Don't forget to add Socialist Worker to your home screen.