Socialist Worker

Cladding firm tries to limit payouts ater Grenfell Tower fire

Issue No. 2633

Combustible cladding has had to be removed from buildings, such as Ferrier Point in east London, after the Grenfell Tower fire

Combustible cladding has had to be removed from buildings, such as Ferrier Point in east London, after the Grenfell Tower fire (Pic: Guy Smallman)


A ban on the use of combustible materials on buildings over 18 metres high is set to come into force on 21 December.

Survivors group Grenfell United pointed out, “This is the first piece of proposed legislative change the government has put forward as a result of the Grenfell Tower fire.”

Flammable material should not be used on any building, including those under 18 metres high.

Arconic manufactured the flammable cladding used at Grenfell. It is being looked at by three private equity groups as a possible takeover target.

But it is trying to evade responsibility for the Grenfell disaster.

Arconic’s main investor is the hedge fund Elliott Management.

It is in talks with the potential buyers over how to avoid liabilities as a result of compensation claims relating to the fire.

“If Arconic is trying to wriggle out of its liabilities in order to limit payments to Grenfell Tower victims, this is a disgrace,” said Labour MP David Lammy.


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