Socialist Worker

Bloody Sunday soldiers will not be prosecuted

by Simon Basketter
Issue No. 2724

British troops killed 13 people on Bloody Sunday in Derry on 30 January 1972. A 14th person died later

British troops killed 13 people on Bloody Sunday in Derry on 30 January 1972. A 14th person died later


Northern Ireland’s Public Prosecution Service (PPS) has decided to uphold its decision not to prosecute 15 former British soldiers over the Bloody Sunday killings in Derry 48 years ago.

Thirteen civilians died when British soldiers opened fire on an anti-internment rally on 30 January 1972 and dozens more were injured.

A 14th person died later.

Last year the PPS announced that one former member of the British Army Parachute Regiment, known as Soldier F, would face charges of murder and attempted murder.

But no other legal actions were planned.

Relatives of a number of those killed and injured sought a review of the decision.

On Tuesday the PPS announced that the test for prosecution is not met on evidential grounds to prosecute any of the 15 soldiers over the specific deaths or injuries sustained on Bloody Sunday.

In a statement, a legal firm representing several families of Bloody Sunday victims described the announcement as deeply disappointing.

Ciarán Shiels of the Madden and Finucane firm said his clients were considering challenging these decisions in the High Court by way of judicial review proceedings.

The PPS confirmed that soldier F’s prosecution will continue.


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