Socialist Worker

Vile queen’s speech sets out Tories’ vicious agenda

by Isabel Ringrose
Issue No. 2754

The Queens speech informs us of further attacks on migrants, refugees and the right to protest.

The Queen's speech informs us of further attacks on migrants, refugees and the right to protest. (Pic: Public Domain)


The Queen’s Speech read in parliament on Tuesday unveiled the Tories’ plans for future attacks.

They include further repression, targeting migrants and asylum seekers, and building legal ­support for military killers.

They also include the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill that has been the centre of the recent Kill the Bill protests.

The speech lists what the ­government plans to make law in the coming year.

It included a host of bills—including some from the current parliamentary session that the Tories want to carry over.

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This year the pomp and ceremony was toned down as the plans were read to a House of Lords constricted by Covid-19.

Boris Johnson claimed, “We will go further to unite and level up the country, fight crime and create opportunities up and down the country for businesses and families to build brighter futures.” In ­reality this means further ­crackdowns, ­scapegoating and divisions.

Application

The Tories are set to demolish the rights of refugees they deem to be “illegal”.

Home secretary Priti Patel’s ­immigration proposals will ­“overhaul” Britain’s asylum system.

How a refugee enters the country will determine the success of their application. Refugees who cross the Channel or travel through a “safe country” will be removed.

It means more racist and ­murderous laws.

The speech outlined bills that are meant to to flesh out the Tories’ “levelling up” agenda.

They included one to create eight new freeports with fewer resrictions on business. National security laws will be introduced to make it easier for the state to prosecute alleged Isis supporters returning to Britain. And prison sentences for terror offences will also be made longer.

These won’t be used on far right extremists, but to scapegoat Muslims.

Democracy will take another hit as photo identification will be required for voters in general elections.

The speech will mention plans to restrict prosecutions of British soldiers who committed crimes in Northern Ireland during the Troubles.

Legislation has already passed to protect war criminals, and this will now be extended to veteran criminals who fought in Northern Ireland.

It seeks to create a permanent legal basis to prevent the sort of investigations that took place after killings in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as those in Ireland.

The police bill is expected to return to the House of Commons on 18 May for the first committee stage hearing.

This is where MPs will examine the bill and can propose amendments.

Further hearings will go on until 24 June when it will return to the full House of Commons for voting.

The bill needs to be opposed in its entirety, and that means stepping up the protests in the streets.


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