By Sarah Bates
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Hurricane Beryl expected to cause huge ruin in the Caribbean

A category 3 storm will hit the Caribbean, showing again how the Global South bears the brunt of climate change
Issue 2912
Hurricane Beryl may tear through the Caribbean next week, causing massive damage

Hurricane Beryl may tear through the Caribbean next week, causing massive damage

Thousands of Caribbean residents were desperately sheltering this week as a powerful hurricane slammed into the islands.

Hurricane Beryl, a Category 3 storm, was expected to strike Grenada, St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Monday.

Islanders are facing catastrophic impacts such as damage to homes, widespread power outages and threats to residents’ safety.

Hurricane warnings were also issued for Barbados, St Lucia and Tobago.

“Shelter in place or evacuate to a safe location if your home is unsafe or vulnerable to flooding or wind damage,” said the Trinidad and Tobago

Meteorological Service. “Secure food, water and medicine for at least seven days in waterproof containers. Outdoor drains should be clear and loose objects secured by now. Sandbags should be near all entrances to your home.”

On Sunday, the hurricane unleashed 120 mph winds and threatened devastating storm surges and flooding.

The National Hurricane Center warned that “a life threatening storm surge will raise water levels by as much as 6 to 9 feet above normal levels” where it reaches landfall.

The impact is likely to create towering waves, which will rip apart fishing vessels and waterside homes.

The severity and the timing of Beryl marks another ghastly milestone for climate catastrophe.

It’s the strongest storm ever recorded in the month of June, and marks an exceptionally early start to the Atlantic hurricane season.

It could yet be the strongest storm seen since Hurricane Ivan in 2004. Usually, hurricanes hit later in the season, typically August.

This is the time when the central and eastern Atlantic Ocean temperatures have had time to warm and fuel storms and hurricanes.

This is because of climate catastrophe—a preventable but now inevitable feature of capitalism.

Those in the Caribbean are one of the earliest communities on the globe to feel the devastating impacts of the latest phase of ecological destruction.

But they won’t be the last.

This is a developing story which will be updated.

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