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Overpriced and chaotic - Britain's sold out railways


If a council worker has to commute by train to London from Chelmsford in Essex, they’ll pay £348.70 a month for the privilege. In a year the cost is £3,540.

Tories and Labour have always let bosses ride free


Britain’s rail network was nationalised 65 years ago—for the second time.

Railway neglect that costs lives


Poor maintenance under Railtrack led to a crash at Potters Bar that killed seven people in 2002.

'Bedroom tax' will force people out of their homes


The government’s attack on benefits could see thousands of people lose their homes. One attack in particular, popularly known as the "bedroom tax", is set to push almost 100,000 social housing tenants into arrears on their rent from this April.

Meet the loan sharks who trap millions in debt misery


Up to four million people planned to take out a payday loan to cover the cost of Christmas. Now, with the festivities finished, they’ll be stuck with the financial hangover.

Osborne cuts £950 a year from the poorest families in Britain


Tory chancellor George Osborne admitted on Wednesday of last week that his economic plan isn’t working—even on its own terms.

Underemployment: the struggling workers hidden by jobs figures


Over three million people work- ing in Britain are struggling to survive on the pay they receive each month—and want to work more hours than they can get. That’s the finding of a new report from the Office of National Statistics (ONS).

New oil production techniques will speed up climate change


Whatever happened to peak oil? Only a few years ago it was common to hear speculation that global oil production had peaked and would slowly peter out—forcing capitalism to adapt its energy use. But by last year oil production was increasing again, especially in North America.

The Kincora scandal: child abuse and cover-up in 1970s Belfast


The Kincora Boys’ Home in Belfast was opened in 1958. The home’s warden Joe Mains at once started to abuse the boys in his care. Mains recruited Raymond Semple and William McGrath in the 1970s and they joined in the daily brutal abuse.

Eddie Stobart: the firm leading the way in attacks on lorry drivers


From children playing "Spot the Stobart Lorry" on motorway trips to the Channel 5 TV documentary, haulage company Eddie Stobart has a knack for having good PR.

How to close the gender pay gap


Women who used to work for Birmingham City Council last week won a step forward in their claim for equal pay.

Tribunals are unfair, and the Tories will make it worse


The government is attacking workers’ rights again. Lib Dem lapdog Vince Cable claims he wants to reduce "the burden of employment tribunals" on firms.

How the Tories aim to shift the terms of the abortion debate


One in three women in Britain will have an abortion in their lifetime. When the Abortion Act made abortion legal in 1967 it was a milestone moment in the fight for women’s liberation.

Heathrow airport expansion row: competition is key Tory priority


Heathrow airport expansion has set leading Tories at each other’s throats. But this has nothing to do with meeting our travel needs and everything to do with competition.

The housing vultures that circle over new students


As the new term begins, private housing bosses are licking their lips at the prospect of cashing in on students.

Overfishing: is it the end of the line for North Sea cod?


A century ago, it was common to catch North Sea cod that were two metres long and weighed more than 90kg. Today they are more likely to come in at a puny 35cm.

Violence is at the core of the Northern Irish state


Sectarian rioting broke out earlier this month in Northern Ireland. It followed a series of provocative Orange Order marches going past the St Patrick’s Catholic Church, just on the outskirts of Belfast city centre.

Map of Belfast showing link between poverty and violence



Nature is not to blame for the human cost of hurricanes


The reality of how devastating storms affect different populations differently can be seen with 1994’s Hurricane Jeanne. Like Isaac, it raged through the Caribbean and the coast of the US.

How the police and the law fail women over rape


The entire criminal justice system is stacked against women who experience rape—from the attitudes of the police to low conviction rates and low sentences.

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