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Protest over torture in Greece Support was growing this week across the Greek labour movement for a demonstration this Saturday over the torture of Pakistani immigrants by the intelligence agency last summer.

Mali is the next stop for the World Social Forum


Thousands of people were travelling to Bamako in Mali, west Africa, this week for the World Social Forum (WSF).

Ariel Sharon: Butcher of Beirut, not a man of peace


The media is presenting critically ill Israeli leader Ariel Sharon as a ‘peacemaker’, but Palestinian Fatima Helou looks at his brutal record

Gaza disengagement was new stage in Israeli control


The day that Ariel Sharon slipped into a coma British foreign minister Jack Straw announced to the Lebanese press in Beirut that he was "praying for a miracle" to save Sharon’s life.

‘Soft dictatorship’ is US’s vision for Iraq


After the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, the Kurdish region was held up as a democratic model for the country. But today it is ribboned with anger and disillusion.

Election result shocks Bolivia


Evo Morales, the leader of the left wing MAS party, was elected as the new president of Bolivia in December. His victory is a reflection of the mass movement against neo-liberalism that has shaken the country in recent years. Valerie Mealla writes from Bolivia

Protests shake up WTO in Hong Kong


The World Trade Organisation’s (WTO) ministerial meeting in Hong Kong before Christmas saw massive protests each day that the delegates met, with thousands joining every day.

Services in the developing world under further attack from WTO


The WTO did not deliver everything the most powerful governments wanted. Many factors held them back. As well as the protests, these included splits between the US and the EU, splits within the EU and splits between the poorest countries and rising powers such as China, Brazil and India.

Sudanese refugees slaughtered by police in Egypt


Egyptian police killed at least 27 Sudanese refugees, including 12 children, when they stormed a protest camp outside the offices of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in Cairo.

Italian valley rises to save the environment


There was a roar in the darkness. A mechanical digger was lumbering towards them. Behind it were 2,000 police in riot gear. The few dozen protestors fled from their tents.

Iraq round-up


Hospitals targeted Health workers in Iraq have launched an international campaign demanding an end to harassment by US troops and their allies.

New Zealand Starbucks strike


Workers across Auckland, New Zealand, joined the world’s first strike at Starbucks coffee shops last month.

No WTO deal better than bad deal


We say that no deal at the WTO is much better than a bad deal. The draft text released for the upcoming ministerial meeting of the WTO, if agreed in Hong Kong, will destroy the livelihoods of peasants, small farmers, landless and indigenous peoples, fisherfolk and workers the world over.

Forging a new left party in Germany


The breakthrough at the general election, with the 54 MPs for the Left Party returned, was a great advance for the left.

Italian students develop a thirst for political discussion


On the final day of November the psychology department of Rome’s La Sapienza university is a hive of activity.

Tanzania water privatisation


British water company Biwater is suing Tanzania, one of the poorest countries in the world, in revenge for being thrown out of country by the government earlier this year.

Baghdad protest unites Sunnis and Shias


Thousands of Sunnis and Shias held a joint demonstration in Baghdad on Friday of last week. The protest was called to denounce military raids, widespread arrests and torture of Sunni Muslims at the hands of the ministry of interior police.

Neo-liberalism holds back the fight against Aids


Five million more people were infected with Aids last year, taking the number of people with the disease to over 40 million, the UNAIDS organisation reported last week. The United Nations drive to get anti-retroviral drugs to poorer countries has fallen short because of failings by politicians and the drug companies.

French state steps up its repression


The right wing government in France has unleashed a new wave of repression on the banlieues, the poor suburbs that exploded into three weeks of rioting.

Market rules mean that famine hits poor countries


Five months after the G8 leaders gathered at Gleneagles and vowed that they would tackle world poverty, famine is sweeping regions of Africa.

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