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Why Tesco profits are rotten to the core


Tesco announced record profits of over £2 billion last week, but that "success" is built on dreadful conditions of workers who supply their goods.

‘Neo-colonial rule’ still exists in Bosnia and Kosovo


A damning report published last week by the International Commission on the Balkans has slammed United Nations and European Union peacekeeping in Bosnia and Kosovo.

Palestinian teachers’ fight highlights their oppression


Around 37,000 Palestinian teachers from across all the Occupied Territories — the West Bank and the Gaza Strip — were on their second one-day strike last week in support of a demand for higher salaries. Most teachers earn a paltry $400 per month. This has barely changed since the Israeli occupation began in 1967.

Growing Egyptian revolt worries the global elite


Thousands of students across Egypt last week confronted riot police as part of the growing wave of protests demanding democratic reforms.

Repression used to enforce free market economics in Egypt


Egypt was the very first Third World state to embark on wholesale policies of privatisation.

South African strike wins some real harmony for workers


The two-week strike by miners at the Harmony gold mines in South Africa (Socialist Worker, 9 April) has won important concessions.

Miners battle against South Africa’s glittering elite


At the start of this week there were over 20,000 miners on strike in Free State at gold mines owned by the Harmony firm. Workers are 100 percent behind the action and are determined to fight until they win. The company has claimed that the strike is about job losses, but this is not true.

Bahrain — the revolt they'd rather you didn’t know about


A huge protest for democracy took place in the Middle East recently. But you won’t have heard about it from the Western media, and there won’t be stirring speeches in its support from George Bush or Tony Blair.

Genoa G8 trial gets underway


The trial of 28 Italian police officers involved in a violent assault on protesters during the anti-G8 demonstrations in Genoa in July 2001 was set to start on Wednesday of this week.

Trouble brewing on Sri Lankan tea plantations


I WANT to start by explaining a few things about the history of the tea plantations. The plantation industry was introduced around the world by countries such as Britain during the colonial period.

Bushmen's rights ignored by mining company in Botswana


The Gana and Gwi Bushmen have launched an appeal against attacks by the government of Botswana in southern Africa, and the mining corporations.

Iraq in brief


Minister warns against protests Iraq’s interior minister has told Iraqis not to demonstrate against the regime. Falah al-Naqib told journalists on Monday that protests were among "attempts to destabilise the situation" in Iraq.

Middle East democracy that the US fears


Cairo, in Egypt, is at the heart of the Arab world. The talk in the city is of coming change. For nearly 25 years Washington’s ally, Hosni Mubarak, has ruled the country. In each of those years emergency laws have been in force.

Iraq: ‘We can see there are different forces in Britain’


Sheikh Hassan al-Zarqani is the foreign affairs spokesperson for Moqtada al-Sadr, the rebel Iraqi Shia cleric. Sadr’s Mahdi Army launched an armed uprising against the US occupation of Iraq in April 2004. Sheikh al-Zarqani lives in exile in Lebanon after the US issued a warrant for his arrest. He represented Moqtada al-Sadr’s movement at the Cairo Conference.

Torture, murder and resistance in Egypt


Before daybreak on Friday 4 March, police intelligence units arrested men, women and children in Sarandu. They violently beat residents, sparing nobody.

Guatemalan protesters take to streets over Cafta trade deal


Police in Guatemala have shot dead two protesters and wounded others during a demonstration against a new trade agreement. The men were killed on Tuesday of last week, following six days of mass protest.

Political crisis deepens in Nepal


On 1 February the king of Nepal declared a state of emergency. The country was cut off for several days from the outside world as the Royal Nepalese Army severed all telecommunications links.

Vulnerable Zimbabweans deported to face brutal treatment


A REPORT on the usually reliable newzimbabwe.com website details how Ratidzo (not her real name) was treated on her arrival recently at Harare airport.

Bolivian movement unites to fight president and corporations


The Latin American country of Bolivia is witnessing another bout of struggles between the government and the movements which oppose its policies. President Carlos Mesa resigned last week because of the huge scale of the mobilisations against him. But the next day he was back in office.

Deeper interests behind the Lebanese protests


The demonstrations calling for the withdrawal of Syrian troops from Lebanon converge on Martyrs Square in downtown Beirut. The square is better known as Solidere, after the multi-billion dollar property company partially owned by former prime minister Rafiq Hariri.

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