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US imperialism, capitalism and Cuban protests


The current protests in Cuba have raised arguments. Sophie Squire analyses the nature of Cuban state capitalism, the pressure from the US and today’s revolt.

Lessons of Hong Kong resistance


It has been one year since the repressive Security Law was enacted in Hong Kong. Lam Chi Leung, an activist based in Hong Kong, explains how the situation has changed.

Tories will make rescuing refugees a crime


The Nationality and Borders Bill seeks to criminalise refugees over how they enter Britain. Refugees and activists spoke to Isabel Ringrose about the escalating attacks on refugee rights.

A mistake of Olympic proportions in Tokyo


The Tokyo Olympic Games is set to start this month. Sam Ord investigates the scale of the Covid health crisis ignored by officials, and the reality of how the event build profits and nationalism for rulers

What’s behind the downfall of social democracy?


Following Labour’s poor showing in recent by-elections Nick Clark explores the pattern of declining support for social democratic parties across Europe.

Ultraviolence—giving voice to victims of killer cops


Director Ken Fero talks to Socialist Worker about injustice and his new film Ultraviolence

Palestine—is one state possible?


The idea of a single-state solution in Palestine is gaining traction, but some say that ‘old hatreds’ make this impossible. Nick Clark argues that resistance can break the hold of reactionary ideas and lead to a Palestinian state

How the Corn Laws split the ruling class


It has been 175 years since the repeal of the Corn Laws. Isabel Ringrose explores how the bosses’ arguments over trade can open the door for working class resistance

Why the cops are corrupt to the core


The inquiry into the investigations into the murder of Daniel Morgan declared last week that the Metropolitan Police is ‘institutionally corrupt’. Simon Basketter explains why fraud is built into the police

Peru—a radical history of resistance


Pedro Castillo’s election win in Peru has cheered the left. Sophie Squire looks at the country’s history of struggle but also sounds some warnings for the future

Cover-up! How the state helped hide the truth about the murder of Daniel Morgan


Daniel Morgan was ­murdered beside his car at the back of the Golden Lion pub in Sydenham, south east London, in 1987. He had met his business partner Jonathan Rees for a drink.

G7 Summit—world leaders accelerate towards climate chaos


The G7 Summit this week in Cornwall will see the world’s most powerful leaders discuss a response to the environmental emergency. Sophie Squire explores the leaders’ response to the climate crisis that is threatening all our futures

The Peasants’ Revolt—when people fought corruption


In 1381 thousands of peasants stormed London and demanded change from the king. Nick Clark explains why the Peasants’ Revolt holds important lessons 640 years on

Tory school recovery plans won’t benefit children


For the Department of Education it is vital that children “catch up” on the hours of education lost due to the pandemic.

What does it mean to be non-binary?


The Tories’ determination not to recognise people who are non-binary helps spread fear and prejudice. Isabel Ringrose spoke to people at the sharp end of this pernicious form of discrimination

Why the US backs Israel


The US sometimes poses as a friend of Palestinians—but will never end its support for Israel. Sophie Squire explains what’s behind their relationship

Imperialism and national liberation


Across the world in the face of imperialism and occupation, demands are put forward for self-determination and national independence.

Battle within a terror state


Across the whole of Palestine there have been signs of a new wave of resistance to Israel’s apartheid regime. Nick Clark talks to those on the front lines of the revolts

Who is working class?


A debate is raging about the attributes that make us working class to try and understand why some are losing faith in the Labour Party. Isabel Ringrose explores what really defines class.

Middle East’s ‘pillar of democracy’ was a racist endeavour from the start


Following the annexation of land and Israeli independence, Palestinians were forced into neighbouring nations’ refugee camps.

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