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This Way Up—a show that can laugh at life’s problems


Far from being grim, this is a programme full of empathy and humour

A tree-riffic play about South Africa


Tree, by Idris Elba and Kwame Kwei-Armah, is an incredible immersive experience.

Muckraking political thriller that asks a deep question


The Candidate uncovers the shady side of politics in a way that has us both rooting for a corrupt leader and revelling in his downfall, says Simon Basketter

Does the Cambridge Analytica documentary make a hackish point?


There have been many attempts to portray Donald Trump’s presidential election victory and the vote for Britain to leave the European Union as linked.

The criminal legacy of the London Olympics


A new book exposes the corruption and dodgy deals behind the 2012 Olympic Games in London, writes Simon Basketter

Edinburgh in August, festival days of fear and resistance


The international rise of the right and polarised politics bleeds into the annual theatre and arts festival in the Scottish capital, writes critic Mark Brown

A ‘climate emergency show’ that’s well worth seeing


Tate Modern’s retrospective of Olafur Eliasson’s work is a breath of artistic fresh air.

Hidden nightmare that lies behind the Hollywood dream


Dark Mon£y is a poignant and compelling drama about sexual abuse, class and the corporate elite in the film industry, say?Dean Ryan and Kate Simon

Ari Aster’s over the top folk horror breaks new ground


Midsommar uses all the classic hallmarks of folk horror—but it also has an original touch. It’s certainly not for the faint hearted, writes Gabby Thorpe

Kyle Craft’s latest album leaves you with flat feeling


A glam rock album on a solid label like Sub Pop should deliver something that’s good fun, musically compelling and—given the singer’s self-professed love of Bob Dylan—lyrically engaging.

Kursk—a film that gives a snapshot of Russian society


Kursk—the Last Mission, tells the story of a Russian submarine disaster in 2000. It is for people who like war and disaster films.

Harlem 1969—a forgotten festival of the oppressed


A new book by journalist Stuart Cosgrove uncovers the story of the historic Harlem Cultural Festival. He spoke to Alistair Farrow about its legacy today

Series of Catch-22 defies book’s ‘unfilmable’ reputation


The new TV adaptation of Catch 22 captures the ridiculous and unsettling atmosphere of Joseph Heller’s classic novel.

Asian strikers are heroes in exhibition of Leicester resistance


A new exhibition looks at how the Imperial Typewriters dispute played a part in forcing the anti-racist struggle into workplaces across Britain

Don Pasquale hits the road


The story hinges on how private property—in this case a kebab van—creates inequality and distorts the relationships between individuals.

Sweeping Lee Krasner retrospective


This is an amazing and long-overdue opportunity to see the work of Lee Krasner, a formidable American artist whose importance has often been forgotten.

How system treats refugees with a bureaucratic cruelty


A film about a family that flees to France from the violence of Central African Republic is a condemnation of the asylum system, writes Charlie Kimber

Ulric Cross is brought to life in inspiring film Hero


The imagined words of CLR James to his compatriot Ulric Cross, “You were born in 1917, the year of the Russian Revolution... you were born into freedom,” set the scene for Hero.

When art from streets raged at the silence over HIV and AIDS


Artist Keith Haring’s work came out of the New York graffiti and gay scenes. A new exhibition in Liverpool charts his too-brief career, writes Noel Halifax

Killing Eve is a show defined by its complex characters


The new series of this high octane BBC thriller builds on the complex relationship between spook Eve and assassin Villanelle

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