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Reviews in brief


Romany lives in the Crays The Bromley Museum, Orpington, Kent Phone 01689 873 826 for opening times An exhibiton featuring artwork and photography by over 40 Gypsy children from Bromley, is on show at the Bromley Museum. It is the result of a project run by the Novas Group and the Children’s Society.

Faith: betrayal and survival during the miners’strike


I was working as a dustman for Newark and Sherwood District Council in 1984-5. We emptied bins around the pit villages of Ollerton, Rainworth, Blidworth and Calverton in Nottinghamshire.

Journey from Kashmir to the steel mills of South Yorkshire


Faultlines — Tales from Kashmir and Rotherham26 Februrary Carlisle Business Centre, Bradford 10 April St Peter’s Community Centre, Sheffield For details of other venues phone 01709 367 287

Reviews in brief


Heidi Bradner: Photos from ChechnyaThe Frontline Club, 13 Norfolk Place, London THIS small exhibition of photographs by Heidi Bradner reflects both the horror and the resilience of Chechens facing the onslaught of Vladimir Putin’s "war on terror".

The horrors of war transformed artist William Orpen


THIS exhibition is provocatively titled Politics, Sex and Death. That was enough to make me want to see it.

The Yes Men humiliate global corporations


The Yes MenDirected by Chris Smith, Sarah Price and Dan Ollman Released 18 February

Reviews in brief


Agitate! Educate! Organise! Friday 25 February Victoria and Albert Museum, London.6.30pm-10pm, free THE V&A celebrates a new wave of social protest, observation and documentary in the arts with spoken word performances, poetry slamming and impromptu gigs around the museum.

An interview with David King: Why Trotsky’s picture lay hidden for 70 years


David King, art historian of the truth about the Russian revolution, sadly died last week. As part of his work, David salvaged photographs of Russian revolutionary Leon Trotsky. His aim was to stop Trotsky being erased from the history of the revolution, as he explained to Socialist Worker in this interview in 2005.

Roots Manuva's intricate new album reaches to the movement


Awfully Deep Roots ManuvaBig Dada Recordings

Reviews in brief


The Maids Written by Jean GenetNaach Theatre Company14 and 15 February, MAC Theatre, Birmingham,phone 01214403838<a href="http://www.naachtheatre.com" target = "_blank">www.naachtheatre.com</a> IN THIS unusual and biting perspective on class relations, two maids of a wealthy woman live out a rich fantasy life.

Take a journey to the heart of Turkish culture


FEAR AND hatred of all things Islamic and Middle Eastern is nothing new. Within a relatively short period of time from the 7th century, Islam spread across the Middle East, North Africa and finally into Europe itself, through Spain. Christendom was threatened and outraged. The Eastern Roman Empire faced a new foe — a new "barbarian at the gates".

Capturing the essence of a human being


Schweppes Photographic Portrait Prize 2004National Portrait Gallery, St. Martin’s Place until 20February

In brief


The Return of Jack SplashPlantlifeGut Records PLANTLIFE ARE the missing link between hip-hop and funk, caught somewhere between Sly and the Family Stone, Prince and Outcast.

Scottish poet whose lips could not be sealed


Robert Burns lived in the last third of the 18th century, a time of the most rapid change in Scottish history. The agrarian revolution was squeezing the peasantry, the class into which he had been born, out of existence. The industrial revolution was underway.

An unexciting film that will still knock you sideways


SidewaysDirected by Alexander PayneReleased Friday 28 January

In brief


End of the century — the story of the RamonesDirected by Jim Fields and Michael Gramaglia

A transatlantic history of musical fusion


The British jazz scene has often been overshadowed by its much larger American cousin. But a new series starting on BBC4 next Friday lifts the lid on the development of jazz in this country. In doing so, it offers a fascinating glimpse of Britain’s multicultural history.

Fairy-tale account of horror and beauty in the First World War


A Very Long Engagement Directed by Jean-Pierre JeunetReleased Friday 21 January

in brief


The Rotters’ Club BBC2, starts Wednesday 26 January, 9pm

Children whose lives are caught in a vice


THERE’S A bedroom. A cosy bed, storybooks, toys, pretty curtains, birthday cards. Look closer. The effigy of a little girl on the bed. Is she dead? Unable to move? Above her men’s shoes dangle.

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