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A powerful Don McCullin retrospective on show at Tate Britain


Tate Britain’s Don McCullin retrospective—its first of a living photographer—is a huge collection of 250 of his images

If Beale Street Could Talk—a heartbreaking love story set in a deeply racist society


Director Barry Jenkins’s new film delivers a powerful story about how the results of racism can poison the most beautiful parts of life

Tonight the World—creating a sense of dread using dream diaries and film


Daria Martin brings to life the story of her grandmother, Susi Stiassni who fled the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia

Dior exhibition lifts the lid on a world of glitz and privilege


A new exhibition at the Victoria and Albert museum in London unintentionally exposes the obscenity behind the high fashion industry

Nominations at the Oscars respond to #MeToo era


This year’s Oscars will take some living up to the hype.

Dismissed for decades, now Pierre Bonnard takes centre stage


The French painter is typecast as being a bit lightweight, but a new exhibition at Tate Britain reveals a melancholy and tender artist, writes?Ben Windsor

Remastered: Massacre at the Stadium


Victor Jara was assassinated in 1973 by an agent of General Augusto Pinochet’s regime in Chile

Sharon Van Etten ditches melancholia for more upbeat sound


Sharon Van Etten is back with a new album, Remind Me Tomorrow

Vice—painting a picture of the power behind Bush’s throne


A new film by director of The Big Short, lifts the curtain on the ‘special relationship’ at the heart of George W Bush’s War on Terror

Reviews round-up—True Detective, Toro y Moi album and more


The latest series of HBO’s True Detective rests on a strong performance by Mahershala Ali.

Stan and Ollie delivers dash of slapstick and tenderness


A strong cast of actors fill the shoes of Laurel, Hardy and the people around them in John S Baird’s account of the duo’s twilight years, writes?Pat Carmody

Revolutionary France brought to life in BBC’s Les Miserables


A new adaptation of the lengthy literary classic revives forgotten characters and eschews music in favour of narrative thrust, writes?Dave Sewell

The 12th Man - a tale of defiance with a touch too much nationalism


The 12th Man is a tale of violence and pain against a picturesque backdrop.

Honest and all-too-possible story of abusive relationship


An Impossible Love is a challenging and believable portrayal of a woman’s life torn apart in slow motion by an abusive partner, writes?Sadie Robinson

A vision focused on ordinary people


This is the first major retrospective of the work of Martin Jenkinson. He built his career on documenting the lives of ordinary people.

Let’s get medieval—Ribera and the Art of Violence


Jusepe De Ribera has a grisly reputation but, argues?Ben Windsor, a new exhibition shows he did more than just glorify the violence around him

Lost in a labyrinth of social and political catastrophes


A profound sense of injustice and chaos grips visitors to a new exhibition about identity at Manchester’s Castlefield Gallery, writes?Molly Docherty

Philippines political travel book is a punishing read


Is Philippines president Rodrigo Duterte—“The Punisher”—part of the global rise of the racist right? Or is his rule a distinct, grotesque weirdness all of its own?

Captivating film exposes the complexity of ‘mundane’ life


A story based around a writing group in a small French town reflects on a radical history of struggle and the threat of racism, says Sadie Robinson

Exhibition shines a light on the art of the ‘dark ages’


The artefacts of six hundred years of Anglo-Saxon rule on display at the British Library provide a unique insight into history, writes Camilla Royle

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