Socialist Worker

Africa


Who can end the agony of Africa?

13 October 2004
TO HEAR British chancellor Gordon Brown and European leaders speak you would think that Africa’s debt crisis is almost over.

Britain joins the new ‘scramble for Africa’

13 October 2004
THE MAIN proposal to come out of Blair’s trip was not debt relief or money to combat famine and AIDS.

When Swansea mauled racism

09 October 2004
THIRTY FIVE years ago the people of Swansea took on the massed ranks of police protecting the all-white propaganda machine of the South African apartheid state, the Springbok rugby team.

The crisis nobody wants to talk about

02 October 2004
FIGURES WERE released last week detailing coming mass slaughter and social destruction in South Africa.

Music was his weapon

25 September 2004
THE GREAT African-American writer James Baldwin once wrote, "Artists are here to disturb."

Strike against the diamond empire

11 September 2004
DIAMOND MINE workers in Botswana, southern Africa, have been fighting a bitter battle over wages which has seen mass dismissals, forced evictions—and great solidarity.

Scum behind Equatorial Guinea coup plot

04 September 2004
THE MEN exposed as plotting a coup in Equatorial Guinea are the scum of the earth.

The West has bled Sudan dry

04 September 2004
Without understanding the role and impact of capitalism and superpower intervention in Africa, the responses evoked by horrors such as that unfolding in Darfur, western Sudan, will often be mistaken.

Jamaica's song of freedom

28 August 2004
FOR A small island in the Caribbean with a population of 2.6 million, Jamaica and its people have had a massive cultural impact on the wider world. For 300 years Jamaica was the jewel in the crown of the British colonies in the Caribbean, its riches based on the enslavement of Africans.

In Brief

17 July 2004
Racism in the jobs market PEOPLE WITH African or Muslim names are less likely to get a job interview, a new investigation has revealed.

Struggle continues for real liberation

17 April 2004
WHEN SOUTH Africans went to the polls this week it marked ten years since black people won the right to vote. A cursory examination of South Africa today reveals deep cracks in the post-apartheid capitalist society. Despite big talk about what has been achieved, the rich continue to get richer and the poor poorer. The majority black ANC government wants South Africans to celebrate and relish the newfound peace, justice and national unity after centuries of conflict, division and injustice.

Struggle continues for real liberation

17 April 2004
WHEN SOUTH Africans went to the polls this week it marked ten years since black people won the right to vote. A cursory examination of South Africa today reveals deep cracks in the post-apartheid capitalist society. Despite big talk about what has been achieved, the rich continue to get richer and the poor poorer. The majority black ANC government wants South Africans to celebrate and relish the newfound peace, justice and national unity after centuries of conflict, division and injustice.

How West intervened and fuelled genocide

10 April 2004
GENOCIDE IS an overused word, but ten years ago it took place in the tiny African country of Rwanda. Throughout 100 days between 800,000 and one million people were murdered in a country of just six million. The media coverage remembering these events conveys the horror. But much of it also accepts two arguments. The first is that there was something inexplicable about what occurred-or that perhaps this is something uniquely "African".

Is Tony Blair Robert Mugabe's greatest asset?

13 December 2003
Observing the Commonwealth Conference over the past week, I can't help feeling a degree of grudging admiration for Robert Mugabe, president of Zimbabwe – for all that I detest him for the devastation he has inflicted on his own people.

Nestlé milks its profits from poor

22 November 2003
AROUND ELEVEN million people are facing hunger in the African country of Ethiopia in 2003. But the huge multinational Nestlé has caused outrage by demanding $6 million from the Ethiopian government. It is claiming compensation for a company that was nationalised 27 years ago by the military government and later bought by NestlŽ. Nestlé is one of the world's largest food companies. It makes $6 million profit every hour.

WTO protests

27 September 2003
OVER 900 people packed into a World Development Movement meeting in London last Thursday to hear speakers report back from the WTO talks in Cancun. Prof Yash Tandon, an African delegate to the WTO, gave a perspective from the inside. The FT had a report saying that poor countries were "likely to be the biggest losers" from the collapse of the talks. Yash explained how this was completely upside down-no deal was much better than a bad deal.

WTO meeting

23 August 2003
THE WORLD Development Movement is holding a public meeting on Thursday 18 September to discuss the outcome of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) meeting which will take place from 10 to 14 September in Cancun, Mexico. Speakers include George Monbiot, Professor Yash Tandon (African delegate to the WTO), Carmen Diaz and Barry Coates.

They slashed this refugee's throat

16 August 2003
THE PHOTOGRAPH on this page is of 16 year old Alhassan Kamara. He is an asylum seeker from war-torn Sierra Leone, West Africa. He did not want his full face photographed for fear of being singled out in the future. Known by his friends and family as "Alaska", this young man escaped a brutal civil war.

Can intervention bring peace to Liberia?

09 August 2003
NO SANE person could be unmoved by the terrible suffering of people in the West African state of Liberia. Fourteen years of brutal civil war has seen at least 200,000 people killed out of a population of three million. Many others have been injured or lost their homes.

Modern day slavery

26 July 2003
FAR FROM being a drain on the economy, workers from abroad keep key industries and services in Britain going. The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) showed last week how some parts of the NHS would "cease to function" without nurses from South Africa and the Philippines. Guardian journalist Felicity Lawrence has uncovered how "in food processing there is a hidden army of labour on whom we all depend".

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