Socialist Worker


I Am Not a Witch: The cruel humour behind a mix of tradition and money

I Am Not a Witch: The cruel humour behind a mix of tradition and money In the film, a young girl is accused of witchcraft in Africa and is drawn into a world of corruption and sexism, writes Charlie Kimber

Drought in Southern Africa threatens millions with famine

Millions are suffering in Southern Africa but capitalism can’t solve the climate crisis, says Alistair Farrow 

Philip Kunda

Philip Kunda, a socialist originally from Zambia and an SWP member, has died from liver failure at the tragically early age of 36.

Angry end to Zambian miners' strike

A BITTER strike in Zambia’s copper mines ended last week with some concessions by managers, but with many workers angry that their union leaders had sold them short.

Zambia: where capitalism cuts lives ten years short

"WE WILL not force countries onto our programmes."

Zambia - Strikers fight neo-liberal attacks

AROUND HALF a million trade unionists in Zambia went on strike recently against wage cuts and tax rises forced through by the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. JOYCE NONDE is the general secretary of a union allied to the Federation of Free Trade Unions of Zambia. She was in London last weekend addressing the War on Want conference and spoke to Socialist Worker.

Workers defy IMF demands

28 February 2004
AROUND HALF a million workers in Zambia struck last week against the International Monetary Fund's cuts and the government which implements them. Thousands of Zambians marched on parliament during a strike that closed offices, shops and schools in the capital, Lusaka.

There's no war on famine

21 September 2002
A UN World Food Programme report said this week that 14.5 million people across southern Africa face starvation and famine. The famine doesn't just affect Zimbabwe, which the British media concentrated on as part of its support for rich white farmers against Mugabe's government. It also hits Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique.

Millions left to starve

03 August 2002
WHILE the US and Britain prepare to use vast resources for war, 14 million people in southern Africa have been left to starve. People in Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe are particularly affected. Politicians claim that the suffering is because of drought or "African corruption". In truth people are dying because they are the subjects of a crazed mass social experiment: take a poor society, let the market rip, and see what happens. Far from showering prosperity on Africa, the market prescriptions of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank have produced bigger mounds of corpses.

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