Socialist Worker

Rome


How awkward will Tony Woodley be?

07 June 2003
TONY BLAIR was dealt another severe blow by trade unionists last Saturday when members of the powerful TGWU union elected Tony Woodley as their new general secretary. Woodley, who had wide support from the left in the union, got 66,958 votes, 43 percent. He decisively beat Jack Dromey, seen as the most pro-Blair candidate, who came second with 45,136 votes, 29 percent.

What lies behind panic over SARS?

26 April 2003
SARS. IN a few weeks the word has rolled around the world, bringing panic and fear. SARS stands for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. By the start of this week it had killed at least 200 people in seven countries and infected thousands more. The World Health Organisation warns, "SARS could become the first severe new disease of the 21st century with global epidemic potential."

Anti-war protests sweep the world

23 March 2003
San Francisco, Rome, Buenos Aires, Vienna, London, Sydney, Dhaka, Brussels, Madrid, Athens, Seoul, Tokyo, Mexico City, Edinburgh... and hundreds more

The resistible rise of Benito Mussolini and Italy's fascists

16 November 2002
It was 80 years ago that fascism first came to power, and it happened in Italy. There is a myth that Benito Mussolini seized power after his March on Rome and the occupation of the city by his fascist shock troops. Fascist columns did assemble at four points near the city – but they were lightly armed, ill fed and left standing in the rain.

Around world

05 October 2002
IT WAS not just in London that people took to the streets to protest against war last weekend. Other demonstrations around the world included 5,000 marching in Washington in the US, 50,000 in Madrid in Spain and 3,000 in Athens in Greece. In Rome in Italy 100,000 took part in a demonstration which had a major anti-war theme.

Post

21 September 2002
The postal executive of the Communication Workers Union has narrowly voted in favour of a deal to end the dispute over the privatisation of the Romec cleaning and maintenance section of the Post Office. After a long debate the executive voted by ten votes to six to accept management's offer. The minority who wanted to throw out the deal and push hard for action against the joint venture were absolutely right.

Union leaders are dithering, but build a big vote for action

14 September 2002
POSTAL workers across Britain have begun a strike ballot at long last. It has been called by the CWU union in opposition to management plans to launch a joint venture with one of Britain's nastiest multinationals. Bosses want to transfer CWU union members in the Romec cleaning and maintenance section to a new company 49 percent owned by construction group Balfour Beatty. After weeks of delay the ballot began last week.

National vote starts on strikes

24 August 2002
A NATIONAL strike ballot involving all 180,000 postal staff in Britain begins next Tuesday. It has been called by the CWU union in opposition to management plans to launch a joint venture with one of Britain's nastiest multinationals. Bosses want to transfer 4,000 CWU members in the Romec cleaning and maintenance section to a new company 49 percent owned by construction group Balfour Beatty.

Chance to stamp on sell-off

10 August 2002
PRESSURE FROM below has pushed the leaders of the Communication Workers Union to call a strike ballot over the privatisation of Romec, the Post Office's cleaning and buildings maintenance section. In just over two weeks time, on 27 August, all 180,000 postal workers will begin a strike vote.

Postal workers

27 July 2002
POSTAL WORKERS are on course to begin a national strike ballot over a proposed joint venture with Balfour Beatty. The workers directly affected are in the Romec maintenance and cleaning section. But the plan has implications for all 180,000 postal staff. A strike ballot was supposed to begin at the start of this month, but was halted for further talks.

Post

13 July 2002
LEADERS OF the postal workers' CWU union have halted a national strike ballot. The vote was about the proposed joint venture between the Romec cleaning and engineering section and the private sector.

General strike offers a new vision for a growing movement in Italy

20 April 2002
Did the Genoa protests contribute to the three million strong demonstration called by the CGIL union federation in Rome on 23 March?

Another link in the chain of resistance

20 April 2002
LONDON AND Glasgow are not yet Rome and Barcelona. Nor is Britain yet seeing the kind of militant industrial struggle witnessed in the Italian general strike on Tuesday. Italian workers are fighting the government of Tony Blair's right wing friend Silvio Berlusconi, who is pushing through a major attack on workers' rights. But Britain is not immune from the mood of resistance.

Postal workers

20 April 2002
POSTAL workers should demand action after the latest privatisation move. Post Office bosses announced this week they are continuing with plans to outsource the Romec engineering arm in a £1 billion deal. Work will be transferred to a joint venture with construction giant Balfour Beatty. Romec employs 5,000 people.

Tide of revolt sweeps Rome

27 March 2002
THREE MILLION Italian trade unionists, students, immigrant workers, unemployed people and pensioners defied Tony Blair's key European ally last Saturday. Six huge feeder protests marched to the centre of Rome to demonstrate against Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi's plans to "reform" laws protecting workers. Some 9,200 coaches, 61 special trains, five aeroplanes and four boats brought people to Rome from across Italy.

500,000 call Italy's leader a lying thief

09 March 2002
Half a million Italians demonstrated in Rome last Saturday against the right wing government of millionaire businessman Silvio Berlusconi. The demonstration was organised by the Democratic Left party and its allies in the Olive Tree coalition. The Democratic Left is a part of the old Communist Party that adopted policies similar to the British Labour Party.

Italy: Mass protest for pay and against the war

24 November 2001
About 250,000 striking engineers took part in a national demonstration in Rome, Italy, last week. Strike action shut dozens of major workplaces up and down the country. Officially, the strike was over a £10 a month pay increase, but in the highly politicised atmosphere of Italy it was about much more than getting a pay rise in line with inflation.

Stop the war: Worldwide Movement

10 November 2001
Major mobilisations against the war were due to take place across the world this weekend and next. In Italy three days of action described by the Il Manifesto newspaper as "against the war and the World Trade Organisation" were planned, culminating in a national march in Rome.

STOP THE WAR... STOP THE WAR... STOP THE WAR... STOP THE WAR...

13 October 2001
AROUND 15,000 people protested in Rome on Monday against the war. The protest was called by COBAS, the trade union organisation, and left wing political party Rifondazione. Also in Italy, in Milan 5,000 protested, while around 2,000 people joined demonstrations in Naples.

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